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Communication: Receptive language, expressive language, and speech production.

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Resources

  • 1. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Communication Toolkit: Birth to 5
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    A series of handouts from the American Speech-Language Hearing Association that outline typical communication development from birth to 5 years old and provide suggestions on how to support communication development at each stage.

    https://identifythesigns.org/communicating-with-baby-toolkit/

     

  • 2. A Brief Guide to Early Stuttering
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This handout outlines speech characteristics that are more or less indicative of a persistent stutter that may merit treatment.

    A Brief Guide to Early Stuttering

     

  • 3. Bilingualism: Facts, Benefits, and Myths
  • by: Brienne McCreery, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This article provides facts about bilingualism, describes the benefits of being bilingual and demystifies common misconceptions about bilingualism.

    http://www.hanen.org/helpful-info/articles/bilingualism-in-young-children--separating-fact-fr.aspx

     

  • 4. Dispelling Myths About Sign Language
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    American Sign Language (ASL) is commonly associated with deaf or hard-of-hearing children, but it can have benefits for children without hearing impairment, as well. This article takes a glance at the relationship between ASL and spoken language, highlighting the positive benefits ASL can have on children’s

  • 5. Is My Child Not Listening? Or Can My Child Not Hear?
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist,Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Most children undergo a hearing screening at birth, but hearing loss can occur at any age. Thankfully, there are behaviors you can look out for that may indicate the need to have your child’s hearing tested and, if a hearing loss is present, get the help

  • 6. Sippy Cups: Three Reasons to Skip Them and What to Offer Instead
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This article offers alternatives to sippy cups to promote optimal speech and swallowing development.

    https://blog.asha.org/2017/02/28/sippy-cups-3-reasons-to-skip-them-and-what-to-offer-instead/

     

  • 7. Speech Sound Norms
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool
  • 8. Speech vs. Language
  • by: Brienne McCreery, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This handout describes the differences between “speech” and “language” with definitions and examples of each term. 

    Speech vs. Language

     

     

     

  • 1. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Communication Toolkit: Birth to 5
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    A series of handouts from the American Speech-Language Hearing Association that outline typical communication development from birth to 5 years old and provide suggestions on how to support communication development at each stage.

    https://identifythesigns.org/communicating-with-baby-toolkit/

     

  • 2. Communicating for Fun Calendars
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This site provides very practical Monday-Sunday theme-based calendars with specific activities to encourage communication in preschoolers.  Many tips are also listed.

    https://connectability.ca/2010/09/28/communicating-for-fun-calendars/ 

     

  • 3. Communication Tips
  • by: Brienne McCreery, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This link provides handouts which include 10 communication tips for various developmental levels (children who communicate without words, children who have just started talking, and children who talk in sentences).
    http://www.hanen.org/Helpful-Info/Parent-Tips.aspx

     

  • 4. Encouraging Speech Sounds Through Reading
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This Super Duper Handy Handout explains how reading helps children develop their speech sounds.  It also provides a list of books for particular speech sounds.

    https://www.superduperinc.com/handouts/pdf/74_childrensbooks.pdf

     

  • 5. Hand Gestures for Speech Sound Production
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Sometimes preschoolers’ ears need a little help to identify the right sounds in words, particularly when we are trying to correct pronunciation. Gestures are an excellent supplement to help children hear the difference between words like “sit” and “sick,” “big” and “pig,” and “E” and “eat.”

  • 6. Speech Sounds: A Guide for Parents and Professionals
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This provides a word list, daily routines, activities, games and toys, songs, books, and conversational phrases for each speech sound.​

    Speech Sounds Guide-Cochlear

     

  • 7. Supporting Language Development at Home
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This handout outlines five simple strategies that can be used in the home to support language development.

    Supporting Language Development at Home

     

  • 8. You Say, They Say: What is Echolalia and What to Do About It?
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist,Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Repeating what others say, also known as echolalia, is just one of the many ways that children acquire language. The question is what differentiates typical echolalia from echolalia that is part of a broader delay or disorder? This article defines both types of echolalia while also

      

     

  • 1. Colorín Colorado
  • by: Brienne McCreery, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    A bilingual site for educators and families of English language learners. The “for families” tab includes a list of articles and a resource library.
    http://www.colorincolorado.org/families

     

  • 2. The Hanen Center
  • by: Brienne McCreery, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This website provides an endless list of articles on topics such as: “How to Help Your Child Use Early Sentences,” “Why Interaction Must Come Before Language,” and “E-Book or Paper Book: What’s Best for Young Children?” and many more!
    http://www.hanen.org/Helpful-Info/Articles.aspx

     

     

     

     

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