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How to Help

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  • 1. 10 Tips for Choosing Toys for Speech and Language Development
  • by: Alison Carson, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    As parents, we want to provide our children with fun and engaging toys, but sometimes we just don’t know which toys to choose. This is a great article with excellent tips for choosing toys to support communication development. There is also a link in the article to some of

  • 2. 12 Home Activities that Build Social Emotional Skills
  • by: Alison Carson, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Social-emotional development is important because it helps children to build healthy relationships, manage their emotions, and feel empathy. Social-emotional development also supports communication because it helps children listen and follow directions, as well as communicate their needs and emotions. This poster by Pathway 2 Success shares some

  • 3. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Communication Toolkit: Birth to 5
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    A series of handouts from the American Speech-Language Hearing Association that outline typical communication development from birth to 5 years old and provide suggestions on how to support communication development at each stage.

    https://identifythesigns.org/communicating-with-baby-toolkit/

     

  • 4. Apraxia Strategies Parents Can Use at Home
  • by: Hannah Irving, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This infographic provides 10 strategies that parents and caregivers can use at home to maximize communication and embed intervention into daily routines with their child who has apraxia of speech.

    Apraxia Strategies Parents Can Use at Home

     

  • 5. Articulation: Making Speech Sounds More Obvious to your Child
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This offers six practical and easy tips to help parents emphasize speech sounds in order to improve articulation skills.

    Articulation-Making-Speech-Sounds-more-obvious-to-your-Child

     

  • 6. Backwards Chaining Video Supplement
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Did you know that children typically master pronunciation of individual consonant sounds in the middle of words last? The reason is simple - it’s complicated! Word-medial consonants are surrounded by other speech sounds, being influenced by both those that precede and proceed them. Watch this video

  • 7. Communicating for Fun Calendars
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This site provides very practical Monday-Sunday theme-based calendars with specific activities to encourage communication in preschoolers.  Many tips are also listed.

    https://connectability.ca/2010/09/28/communicating-for-fun-calendars/ 

     

  • 8. Communication Tips
  • by: Brienne McCreery, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This link provides handouts which include 10 communication tips for various developmental levels (children who communicate without words, children who have just started talking, and children who talk in sentences).
    http://www.hanen.org/Helpful-Info/Parent-Tips.aspx

     

  • 9. Dialogic Reading: An Effective Way to Read Aloud to Young Children
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This article provides in-depth suggestions for how to encourage language growth through reading picture books with your child. 
    Dialogic Reading

     

     

  • 10. Encouraging Speech Sounds Through Reading
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This Super Duper Handy Handout explains how reading helps children develop their speech sounds.  It also provides a list of books for particular speech sounds.

    https://www.superduperinc.com/handouts/pdf/74_childrensbooks.pdf

     

  • 11. Face to Face
  • by: Hannah Irving, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This video explains why speaking to your child face to face and on their level is important for developing speech and language skills.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Lyn3XW40Kb1tIvWhngLzS8Vy7mnZ9Xnu/view?usp=sharing

     

  • 12. Hand Gestures and Mouth Postures for Cueing Vowel Production
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This visual guide shows hand gestures and corresponding mouth postures that can be used to cue children to produce specific vowels during speech, as well as illustrate the difference between words like “pick” and “peek,” “net” and “nut,” and “eye” and “A.”

  • 13. Hand Gestures for Speech Sound Production
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Sometimes preschoolers’ ears need a little help to identify the right sounds in words, particularly when we are trying to correct pronunciation. Gestures are an excellent supplement to help children hear the difference between words like “sit” and “sick,” “big” and “pig,” and “E” and “eat.”

  • 14. How Parents Can Help Facilitate Articulation Skills
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Use these tips to help improve how your child produces sounds, plus a handy list of books for specific sounds.

    How Parents Can Help Their Children with Articulation

     

  • 15. Improving Articulation Using Backwards Chaining
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    When teaching a new skill we often start at the beginning. This can be challenging for children who are struggling to master a skill. One way of learning a new task while giving your child a sense of achievement is to use the backward chaining technique.

  • 16. Minimal Pairs and Hand Gestures to Improve Articulation
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Need a visual way to highlight the difference between how your child says a word and the “correct” way to say it (and make progress towards the latter)? Minimal pairs and speech sound hand gestures are a winning combination! Watch this video to find out what

  • 17. Shareable Strategies for Working with Preschoolers with Developmental Language Disorders
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This article, published by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, provides simple suggestions for optimizing communication with kids with developmental language disorders. 

    Shareable Strategies for Working With Preschool Children With DLD

     

     

  • 18. Speech and Language Tip - Model Up
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    View this 3-minute video to discover how to build on what your child says by adding one or two words to your child’s spontaneous speech.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jIAKeGegDSe09GfkXFgYIYXl0oxBRrjG/view?usp=sharing

     

  • 19. Speech and Language Tip - Offer Choices
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Watch this 5-minute video to learn how to expand language and improve communication skills by offering your child choices throughout the day.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1o4_tqhAEOaozICxEXp3yWfnL8J_lDq-b/view?usp=sharing

     

  • 20. Speech Sounds: A Guide for Parents and Professionals
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This provides a word list, daily routines, activities, games and toys, songs, books, and conversational phrases for each speech sound.​

    Speech Sounds Guide-Cochlear

     

  • 21. Speech Sound Hand Gestures Video Supplement
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This video demonstrates the speech sound hand gestures shown in the handout linked here.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1trnjhalYpox3LJ5Nz6ZSSC4BDKax_E4J/view?usp=sharing

     

     

  • 22. Supporting Language Development at Home
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This handout outlines five simple strategies that can be used in the home to support language development.

    Supporting Language Development at Home

     

  • 23. Taking Turns
  • by: Hannah Irving, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This video explains why it is important for speech and language development to take turns with your child when talking and playing with them.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KEqGsSP21tDk9AVAGW1PlU41QfFDYEQS/view?usp=sharing

     

  • 24. Talk, Read, and Sing Together Everyday
  • by: Theresa Martinez, Speech Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Here’s a comprehensive resource to aid in providing a language-rich environment with conversations, asking questions, expanding on language, enriching vocabulary, reading, etc.

    Talk, Read, & Sing Together Everyday

     

  • 25. Wait Time
  • by: Alison Carson, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Children with communication disorders can be successful in following directions and answering questions, but they often need more time to process what we say to them. Frequent repetitions and pressure for a response can interrupt processing and overwhelm a child. Give your child at least 3-5

  • 26. What Should My Child Be Able to Do? What Can I Do to Help? ASHA: 3-4 Years Old
  • by: Ciera Yates, Speech-Language Pathologist, Vail Inclusive Preschool

    This article, published by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, provides a list of some language skills that preschool-aged children should be able to demonstrate. It also provides suggestions for supporting growth in these areas. 

    https://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/34/

     

  • 27. You Say, They Say: What is Echolalia and What to Do About It?
  • by: Matthew Ricca, Speech-Language Pathologist,Vail Inclusive Preschool

    Repeating what others say, also known as echolalia, is just one of the many ways that children acquire language. The question is what differentiates typical echolalia from echolalia that is part of a broader delay or disorder? This article defines both types of echolalia while also

      

     

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